Bourland in North Texas and Indian Territory During the Civil War: Fort Cobb, Fort  Arbuckle & the Wichita Mountains

                             Reviews                                            by Patricia Adkins-Rochette                            Home

                                             Trail Marker Trees
 

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Brad Ward of Grayson County, Tx sent on Jun 6, 2012 the map and photos for this web page, save the last two photos that were sent by an Erath County, Tx. resident.   (Brad's sister, Nelda Ward Keck, bought my book at the 2008 Oklahoma Historical Society Meeting in Ardmore OK and asked me to mail my book to her brother, Brad Ward.) ..  Nelda was the 2007 DAR National Photo Winner with her "Oklahoma Rings in Liberty" photo on the web pages cited immediately below.

 http://www.oklahomahistory.net/ttphotos8a/KeckBell8b.jpg

)http://www.oklahomahistory.net/bellphotos/NeldaWardKeckPhoto2.jpg

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Texas Marker Trees expert

Dr. Linda Pelon, Anthropology Professor
McLennan Community College, Waco, Texas

Dr. Pelon invites readers to send her the location/s of Marker Trees.

lpelon@mclennan.edu    Jun 12,  2012

Whitesboro News Record, Whitesboro TX,  editor Austin Lewter, gson of Jacquita Lewter, news@WhitesboroNews.com

click on article  to enlarge

 

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Trail Marker Trees

Brad Ward suggested this following web site by Dennis Downes that depicts a study of Native American Marker Trees.

http://www.greatlakestrailtreesociety.org/

Trail Marker Trees were an ancient form of land and water navigation that were used by many, if not all, of the Native American tribes and later by fur traders and early pioneers. Examples of these trees have been found all across the United States. Researcher Dennis Downes was introduced and educated about Trail Trees as a young boy and has spent nearly thirty years of his adult life locating, documenting, and educating others about these historical icons. Throughout his research, Downes has worked with numerous Native American tribes and historical experts, archeologists, arborists, and anthropologists across the country to bring further credence to this study.

Downes' research has influenced people across the country and brought greater awareness of the Trail Marker Trees to the public. He has traveled to nearly every state and presented over 100 Trail Marker Tree exhibits and lectures. As a result, he has been consulted by many newly formed interest groups regarding the Trail Marker Trees from across the country and Canada including the Almond Historical Society in New York, the Mountain Stewards in Georgia, the Heritage State Parkway Project based in Wisconsin, the Dallas Historic Tree Coalition in Texas, and many others. In his newly completed book, Downes reflects on many of his interactions with different groups across the country and urges them to focus on factual research and preservation of these Native American historical icons. Downes' decades of research truly have helped to raise awareness and guide this new generation of researchers and interest groups in the right direction.

With the completion of his book, Native American Trail Marker Trees: Marking Paths Through the Wilderness, Downes was able to share insight from his thirty year study. The book not only gives factual and photographic documentation of the Trail Trees; it also tells a story about the involvement of numerous individuals and groups throughout history in forming, preserving, and protecting these landmarks. Numerous Native American Tribes, explorers, pioneers, historians, garden clubs, and interest groups have been involved with the Trail Marker Trees throughout their existence. Over the past century and even today groups such as the Daughters of the American Revolution, Boy and Girl Scouts of America, and Historical Societies around the country have made efforts to raise awareness about these rapidly disappearing culturally modified landmarks. Downes' 264 page book is both historically factual and artistically beautiful, although it is by no means the end of his continuous study.

http://www.greatlakestrailtreesociety.org/

 

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Groups identify trees bent by American Indians

by Jamie Stengle,  Associated Press

Published Sunday, Monday, April 2, 2012

http://www.nativetimes.com/life/people/7052-groups-identify-trees-bent-by-american-indians

 

 

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Brad Ward's Marker Tree in his Gordonville, Tx yard.

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The six white flags on this map are keyed to the following Marker Trees near Brad Ward's home.

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Flag No. 1 on the map represents this tree.

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Flag No. 3 on the map represents this tree.

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Flag No. 4 on the map represents this tree.

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Flag No. ? on the map represents this tree.

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Flag No. ? on the map represents this tree.

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Flag No. 5 on the map represents this tree

 

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Photos taken Summer and Winter of 2011of a Trail Marker Tree, a post oak,  in the Huckabay Community, Erath County, Tx. 

Joyce Chandler Whitis of Erath County, TX.  We are getting this tree certified as an Indian Marker Tree.  It  is in the works.  photo Jun 2012.
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Search  on  www.bourlandcivilwar.com

Patricia Adkins-Rochette        01/11/2014           prochette@Juno.com    

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Bourland in North Texas and Indian Territory During the Civil War: Fort Cobb, Fort Arbuckle & the Wichita Mountains