Bourland in North Texas and Indian Territory During the Civil War: Fort Cobb, Fort Arbuckle & the Wichita Mountains

by Patricia Adkins-Rochette

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  Carter County OK Surveys of July 1871 and June 1899

by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management

Below are some of the legal descriptions of places of now Carter County mentioned on

http://www.glorecords.blm.gov/SurveySearch/     Unless otherwise stated, these data are from an 1899 survey

http://www.okgenweb.org/okprojects/carter/carter-matrix.html     township maps

 

1S 3W sec 6,      Tussey        (Henry Tussey lived just north of the Carter-Garvin line; most records in Garvin County)

1S 3W sec 6/9,    Sandy Bear Creek

1S 3W sec 10,     Wildhorse Creek

1S 3W sec 22,      Monk

1S 3W sec 35,      Flag Creek

2S 1E sec 29,       Henryhouse Creek..... (Montford Johnson [1843-1896] built a 2-room house about January 1863 in  twp 3S ran 1W sec 19 on the north bank of Caddo Creek near the juncture of Henry House Creek.)

2S 1E sec 36,       Tulip Creek

2S 2E sec 28,        Cool Creek

2S 2E sec 11,        Doughtery

2S 3E sec 22,       Nebo

2S 3E sec 25,      Oil Creek

2S 3E sec 3,        Buckhorn

3S 3E sec 35,      Baum

3S 3E sec 19,      Berwyn

3S 2E sec 24,       Berwyn

3S 3E sec 3,        Cool Creek

3S 3E sec 12,       Wyatt

2S 3W sec 16,     Freeo, 1899

2S 3W sec 23,      Fox, 1899

2S 3W sec 2,        Flag Creek, 1899

2S 3W sec 19,      Wilson Creek, 1899

2S 3W sec 26,     Briar Creek, 1899

2S 3W sec 21,     Caddo Creek, 1871

3S 1E sec 18,       Asphalt Mine

3S 1E sec 14,      Tulip Creek

3S 1E sec 31,      Sullivan Creek

3S 1E sec 20,      Caddo Creek

3S 1E sec 10,      Glenn

3S 1E sec 12,     Henryhouse Creek    (Montford Johnson [1843-1896] built a 2-room house about January 1863 in  twp 3S ran 1W sec 19 on the north bank of Caddo Creek near the juncture of Henry House Creek.)

3S 1E sec 23,     Tucker

3S 1W sec 35,     Newport

3S 1W sec 3,       Otterville

3S 1W sec 10     Hickory Creek     

3S 1W sec 6,       Spring Creek

3S 1W sec 15,     Caddo Creek    (Montford Johnson [1843-1896] built a 2-room house about January 1863 in  twp 3S ran 1W sec 19 on the north bank of Caddo Creek near the juncture of Henry House Creek.)

3S 2E sec 32,       Caddo Creek 

3S 2W sec 22,     Wheeler

3S 2W sec 32,     Redoak

3S 2W sec 3,      Bear Creek

4S 3W sec 3,      Whiskey Creek

4S 3W sec 2,      Walnut Bayou

4S 3W sec 11,     Healdton

5S 3W sec 25,     Spring Creek

5S 3W sec 31,      Clear Creek

5S 3W sec 28,     Little Salt Branch

5S 3W sec 23,     Reck

5S 3W sec 6,        Redoak Creek

5S 2W sec 9,       Demijohn Creek

5S 1E sec 33,       Spring Branch

5S 1E sec 18,       Prock

5S 1E sec 10,       Hickory Creek

5S 1W sec 35,      Cheek

5S 1W sec 21,      Walnut Bayou

5S 1W sec 22,     Bull Creek

5S 2E sec 36,      Hoxbar

5S 2E sec 23,     West Creek

5S 2E sec 23,      Anacharche Creek

5S 2E sec 9,       Ardmore

5S 2E sec 23,     Lebanon

5S 3E sec 6,       Provence

5S 3E sec 25,      McMillan

5S 3E sec 33,     Wilson Creek

5S 3E sec 29,     Wilson P.O.

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Patricia Adkins-Rochette        03/20/2013           prochette@Juno.com    

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Bourland in North Texas and Indian Territory During the Civil War: Fort Cobb, Fort Arbuckle & the Wichita Mountains

 

Years ago before statehood Wilson, Oklahoma was located in the very far SE corner of Carter county, in an area east of what would become Lake Murray. When it was moved to

where Wilson is located today, it was called New Wilson. The old Wilson was located near the Wilson Creek and nearby was the Wilson Creek cemetery.  A T&T Reader's

daughter was at the Wilson Creek cemetery a few days ago, and took some digital night photos while inside the cemetery. The nighttime photos below have some very strange

images on them.... orbs, aberrations, mists, ghosts or whatever they might be called, they're still strange images on the pictures.  I sure don't know what the images are, so take a

look, and you be the judge.  Butch Bridges, This 'n That, Vol 13  Issue 625; January 15, 2009.  >> http://www.oklahomahistory.net/newsletters/TT625.htm<<

 

 
O.H.S Vol 23 pgs total 20 name this Chickasaw manual labor school in 1857 with a list of 141 male students- for example1857; Mon{t}ford  Johnson, Alex McClish, Alford McClish, Dickerson McClish, Richard McClish,& Johon McClish anyway this looks like a some what big family. I did find a 1855 TREATY James N. McLish on with Judge-chickasaw delegation also-in 1837 in Mississippi Doaks stand Chickasaw signer was Witness John McLish, Pitman Colbert, James Perry--anyway they go back to ms. area.  This school should be a good addition for names and a aid for a' Chickasaw researcher' this school closed in 1859..  

 

O.H.S Vol 23 pgs total 20 name this Chickasaw manual labor school in 1857 with a list of 141 male  students- for example1857;  Mon{t}ford  Johnson, Alex McClish, Alford McClish, Dickerson McClish, Richard McClish,& John McClish anyway this looks like a some what big family. I did find a 1855 TREATY James N. McLish on with Judge-chickasaw delegation also-in 1837 in Mississippi Doaks stand Chickasaw signer was Witness John McLish, Pitman Colbert, James Perry--anyway they go back to ms. area. his school should be a good addition for names and a aid for a' Chickasaw researcher' this school closed in 1859..  

Indian Bayou Trail. The historic Santa Fe Trail routed in the 1820s from Independence, MO crossed only the northwest corner of present Oklahoma Panhandle. Near northeast Healdton, a principal Indian trail, perhaps as old as any of the upper Red River valley, crossed the Bayou. On a pre-Civil War map it is shown as "Cloud Road." (Marcy's Route, 1851). This trail extended from the mouth of Mud Creek on the "river Rouge", later "Rio Roho" and lately called Red River, northward beyond Wild Horse Creek. Another early map shows "Warren's T. H." (Trading House) in the vicinity of Rubottom near its beginning. This trail is plotted as bending northward along the east bank of Mud Creek to due north into old Healdton, then along the east side of the Arbuckle Mountains to about present Hennipin, Oklahoma.

The endless struggles over old Indian trails, wagon roads or even the mud ruts of the near past have gone before and are no more. Modern travel, like time, flies, but modern highways, like ancient Rome are not built in one day.